Information For Authors

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Upcoming Issues

TitleIssue EditorsSubmission DateRelease Date
'alternative' Grady Hancock13 Jan. 201715 Mar. 2017
'build' Rachel Franks and Simon Dwyer26 Feb. 201726 Apr. 2017
'caption' Katie Ellis, Mike Kent, and Gwyneth Peaty21 Apr. 201721 June 2017
'depict' Marj Kibby16 June 201716 Aug. 2017
'history' Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Lloyd Carpenter11 Aug. 201711 Oct. 2017

 

'alternative'

Unconventional, uncommon, irregular, off-beat, counter to - as in contradistinction to the popular. Here we look to the margins of film and media, practice and industry to explore alternative approaches to popular modes of thinking and doing.

Finding the alternative can come to mean a number of discursive approaches in its collision with film and media more broadly - from alternative modes of storytelling, alternative ways of producing and consuming film and media, to alternative and oppositional ideologies. Subversions of the mainstream, wherever that may be found by scholar and critic alike, lead to an astonishing array of alternative voices in the film and media landscape. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to harness some of those voices.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 13 Jan. 2017
  • Release date: 15 Mar. 2017
  • Editor: Grady Hancock

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to alternative@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'build'

Rowan Moore, in his work Why We Build: Power and Desire in Architecture, notes that "most people know that buildings are not purely functional, that there is an intangible something about them that has to do with emotion" (16). Emotion is critical to why and how we build. Indeed, there is a basic human desire to build - to leave a mark on the landscape or on our society. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to unpack this idea of emotion, examining the functional and the creative in the design process, for a range of building projects, from the tangible: building airports, office towers or super structures; to those building projects that are more difficult to define: building a community, a relationship or a reputation.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to how we:

  • Build the "iconic structure"
  • Build a company
  • Build an argument or a school of thought
  • Build collections (from large-scale cultural collections to personal collections)
  • Build audiences (film, television, the performing arts and social media)
  • Build software
  • Build profiles or strategies (from the corporate to the personal)
  • Build relationships
  • Build communities
  • Build confidence and self-esteem
  • Re-build homes, suburbs, or cities

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 26 Feb. 2017
  • Release date: 26 Apr. 2017
  • Editors: Rachel Franks and Simon Dwyer

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to build@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'caption'

Caption - taking, catching, seizure, capture, subtitle, title, translate. Captions are most often associated with making audiovisual content accessible to people with hearing impairments; however, increasingly people are finding mainstream benefits of captions, whether as a learning tool in education, or as a way to capture the attention of Facebook users quickly scrolling through their news feeds, or to watch television in a crowded or noisy area such as bars and gyms. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to investigate the changing uses of captions in media and culture, examining the ways they are increasingly used by larger portions of the population.

Areas of interest that papers might address include, but are not limited to:

  • Automatic captions
  • the role of captions in viral memes and online comedy
  • the evolving dynamics of captions on social media
  • Captions in education
  • Mainstream use of captions by people without hearing impairments
  • History of captions
  • Activism
  • Relationship between the availability of captions and televisions that can display them
  • Lack of captions on catch up television despite availability on same programs being broadcast
  • The role of legislation in ensuring the availability of captions
  • The ageing population

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 21 Apr. 2017
  • Release date: 21 June 2017
  • Editors: Katie Ellis, Mike Kent, and Gwyneth Peaty

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to caption@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'depict'

Inspired by reflections on John Berger's Ways of Seeing on the occasion of his recent death, the M/C Journal 'depict' issue looks at the other side of the communication event - ways of representing, portraying, illustrating, rendering.

While articles could include the depiction of social groupings in the media, it would also cover a wider range of topics such as:

  • Visual representation of data
  • Self-representation and branding
  • Visual depiction and power relations
  • Pictograms and public communication
  • Internet memes and other forms of visual rhetoric
  • Visual communication in social media
  • Digital images and everyday aesthetics
  • Professional journalism and amateur news content

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 16 June 2017
  • Release date: 16 Aug. 2017
  • Editors: Marj Kibby

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to depict@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'history'

For many, the very idea of 'history' calls into question narratives of the past, distant and disconnected from our contemporary moment, and out of tune with the media-centred world of our post-2000 popular culture. This approach to history, however, is based on profound misconceptions, and does not take into account the fact that the present is history: we experience our historical moment via multiple and multi-faceted media practices, from using social media to watching movies, from watching television to consuming food. The past is, in turn, never far removed from our contemporary practices, informing not only the way we live now, but the ways in which our futures evolve. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to redress the critical balance, and re-evaluate and re-vision the notion of history in connection to media and culture.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • representing history in literature, television, and film
  • history and popular culture
  • history as 'narrative'
  • history, media, and communication
  • history and social practices
  • history and national identity
  • history and gender
  • historiographies
  • history and popular iconography
  • historical (mis-)representations
  • food and other cultural histories
  • history, folklore, and myth
  • writing history

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 11 Aug. 2017
  • Release date: 11 Oct. 2017
  • Editors: Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Lloyd Carpenter

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to history@journal.media-culture.org.au.