M/C - Media and Culture Home

Information For Authors

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Upcoming Issues


 
Title Issue Editors Submission Date Release Date
'illegitimate'
Helen Vella Bonavita and Lelia Green
15 Aug. 2014
15 Oct. 2014
'counterculture'
Rob Garbutt, Jacqueline Dutton, and Johanna Kijas
10 Oct. 2014
10 Dec. 2014
'authentic'
Nicholas Hookway and Sara James
16 Jan. 2015
18 Mar. 2015
'technique'
Adam Muir and Daniel Hourigan
27 Feb. 2015
29 Apr. 2015
'fat'
Julie Parsons and Rachel Jarvie
24 Apr. 2015
24 June 2015
'curate'
Bethaney Turner and Cathy Hope
19 June 2015
19 Aug. 2015
'beginnings'
Bjorn Nansen and Tama Leaver
14 Aug. 2015
14 Oct. 2015
're-imagine'
Rachel Franks, Denise Rall, and Simon Dwyer
9 Oct. 2015
9 Dec. 2015

'illegitimate'

"I love bastards! I am bastard begot, bastard instructed, bastard in mind, bastard in valor, in everything illegitimate." (Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida)

As demonstrated above, 'illegitimate' is a value judgement with almost universal application, far beyond simple issues of birth and wedlock. In the present as much as Shakespeare's day, almost all social structures and institutions - families, communities (virtual or otherwise), exchange systems, governance and media - can be defined as legitimate or illegitimate depending on the context in which they exist. Criticism of such entities is legitimate or illegitimate depending upon an individual's perspective: Facebook facilitates legitimate or illegitimate social networks, depending on the country and political system within which it is accessed. In exploring different forms of illegitimacy, we are at the same time exploring how we define and contain what we think of as the legitimate, and how we categorise ourselves and those around us. Illegitimacy is harnessed as a potent method of social, media and familial control, enabling authority figures within society, the family and the nation to set the boundaries for what is and is not licit or acceptable.

And the illegitimate might even be seen to be a more legitimate outcome than the conventional alternative; consider Jon Snow of Game of Thrones fame, whose illegitimacy and consequent liminal status distance him from the political corruption and violence which ravage his legitimate siblings. While the series is as yet unfinished, it is tempting to speculate that Jon Snow's acknowledged illegitimacy will enable him to redeem a political system and society that has become morally, if not openly, itself illegitimate. The bastard in nineteenth-century fiction can be a redemptive figure such as Esther of Bleak House, whose innocence highlights the moral bankruptcy of the religious, social and political systems that marginalise her.

From this perspective the very existence of the illegitimate provides a transgressive and at times invigorating alternative to the mainstream. Bastards in fiction can be vindictive or redemptive; illegitimacy serves as metaphor for emotional conditions and desires that cannot be legitimately expressed. They can be criminal, but can also be 'jokers'; wildcards who succeed precisely because they exist outside normal conventions. Illegitimate texts, children, language, rulers, nationalities, boundaries, coins and governments all exist alongside their legitimate counterparts; illegitimacy enabling us to define what is and is not 'legitimate'. Examining the deployment of illegitimacy as a discourse in fiction, in media and in governance might help us to reconsider how we draw lines, establish borders and define ourselves. This issue invites authors to explore the liminal, the illegal and the illegitimate. Possible topics might include:

  • What makes a bastard?
  • Bastards and pseudo-bastards in literature and media
  • Illegitimate narratives
  • Illegitimacy and emotions
  • Romantic bastards
  • Modern bastards
  • Attractive bastards
  • (Ill)egitimacy and politics
  • Illegitimacy and the Other
  • Illegitimacy and citizenship
  • Illegitimacy and identity
  • Anxious fathers and doubtful sons

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 15 Aug. 2014
  • Release date: 15 Oct. 2014
  • Editors: Helen Vella Bonavita and Lelia Green

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to illegitimate@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'counterculture'

The seeds of the global counterculture sprouted in the 1960s, flourished into the 1970s and for some the counterculture continues to frame their daily lives. Its challenge to the functionalist culture characterised by formal education, career, marriage and mortgage yielded a range of experiments, some failures and short-lived and others long-lasting and now almost mainstream. Whatever the outcome, the intent was not one possible future for one's life but a future of possibilities, along with a commitment to social and environmental sustainability. The counterculture was, therefore, intensely biopolitical in the sense that it was and is a politics of life, one's own life and life on planet earth more generally.

The counterculture was also contested from the beginning. The "counter" has been absorbed into consumer culture and commodified with ease. The love of transgression often saw the politics of power-relations overlooked. And despite being "counter", a relationship with the "mainstream" has always been necessary.

In the 1970s and 80s, the counterculture was alive in academic discussions, but recently it has been relatively dormant. This issue is designed to stimulate reflection and discussion of the counterculture in Australia and beyond. Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • indigenous peoples and the counterculture
  • urban and rural countercultures
  • countercultural festivals
  • back to the land movements
  • utopian experiments
  • media and the counterculture
  • alternative: food, medicine, energy, architecture, childbirth, spirituality, sexuality, lifestyles …
  • the mainstream and the counterculture
  • contemporary manifestations of the counterculture
  • intentional communities
  • the counterculture and consumption
  • competition, cooperation and the counterculture
  • global and peripheral countercultures
  • the "counter" in counterculture
  • the counterculture and environmental movements
  • hippies

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

 

Details

  • Article deadline: 10 Oct. 2014
  • Release date: 10 Dec. 2014
  • Editors: Rob Garbutt, Jacqueline Dutton, and Johanna Kijas

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to counterculture@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'authentic'

CFP coming soon...

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 16 Jan. 2015
  • Release date: 18 Mar. 2015
  • Editors: Nicholas Hookway and Sara James

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to authentic@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'technique'

In this issue we are interested in technique, crafting, making, hacking - as these ideas relate to the knowledge or know-how that informs the social contexts that transform a technology into a medium of expression.

We are seeking contributions which challenge, augment and productively reposition the notion of technique(s) as it relates to: social praxis involving knowledge that breaches the purely technical; techne and/or crafting that masters, re-purposes, or hacks media broadly conceived; the negotiations with technology that produce new aesthetic, social and political forms; other forms of knowing-and-doing that are intellectually fecund.

Areas for consideration may include:

  • political dimensions of makers / hackers
  • psychic dimensions of technology: techne, knowledge, know-how
  • economy of code as interface to technology
  • critique of technological production
  • media praxis
  • communities of crafting
  • political economy of "new" media,
  • cultural techniques
  • forgotten histories of technology/media
  • techniques of control as they relate to knowledge or process

Such areas may manifest as questions such as:

  • what are the cultural politics of craft and technology?
  • where does technique rupture technology or media?
  • why does understanding techniques make a difference in contemporary life?
  • how does mastery of techniques re-imagine and interrupt know-how?
  • does contemporary understanding of specific techniques reveal alternative histories?

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 27 Feb. 2015
  • Release date: 29 Apr. 2015
  • Editors: Adam Muir and Daniel Hourigan

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to technique@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'fat'

We want to explore all things 'fat': the full spectrum of socio-cultural meanings of fat through history, in the media, art, biomedicine and popular culture. Considering fat as substance, embodiment and identity. Experiences of fat and fatness intersect with gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. Fat is a derogatory term, but has also been reclaimed.

Contemporary debates around fat and fatness tend to be polarised and un-nuanced. Fat is characterised as toxic, unhealthy, contagious, disgusting and ugly. Consumption of 'bad' fats and fat bodies are presented as moral, environmental and political issues. Fat is measured, regulated and policed by the self and 'Other'. There is an industry dedicated to the removal and disposal of fat, as well as its transference to other parts of the body. Fat is stigmatising/stigmatised.

Some fats are considered 'good'/healthy. Fat in the 'right' places and in specific socio-cultural contexts is desirable and revered. Fat studies, fat acceptance, fat liberation, fat power and fat activism are counterdiscourses that problematise the dominant framing of fat as bad and challenge discrimination. Alternative cultural representations present fat as beautiful, sexy, and healthy. 'Phat' is also used sub-culturally to denote something that is excellent/gratifying.

This issue of M/C Journal seeks to examine fat in the broadest sense. Areas of interest may include, but are not limited to:

  • Popular cultural representations of fat/fatness
  • Good/bad fat(s)
  • Healthy/unhealthy fat(s)
  • Fat phobia/hatred
  • Fat bodies/embodiment
  • Measuring, regulating, policing fat
  • Sexy fat
  • Aesthetics of fat
  • Fat identity
  • Fat activism
  • Fat acceptance
  • Fat liberation
  • Fat power
  • Fat feminism
  • 'Fat talk'
  • Consuming fat
  • Fat sub-cultures
  • Phat
  • Gay 'Bear' cultures
  • BBW (Big Beautiful Women)
  • Fat porn
  • Fat shaming
  • Fat stigma
  • Fat as disease

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 24 Apr. 2015
  • Release date: 24 June 2015
  • Editors: Julie Parsons and Rachel Jarvie

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to fat@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'curate'

The word 'curate' traditionally refers to a guardian, someone tasked with taking care. For some the etymology of the term may appear an endless fall from grace: from the arcane to the profane, from vocation to action, and from elite to the street. The term begins its journey as a human figure with a window to the divine - the religious curate responsible for the care of souls - then descends to assume a more earthly form manifest in our modern understanding of a curator, as one charged with the collection, archiving and exhibition of cultural artefacts. More recently, as Farquarson notes, the noun 'curate' has morphed into the verb 'to curate', signifying "a shift in the conception of what curators do, from a person who works at some remove from the processes of artistic production, to one actively in the thick of it". This shift strengthens "the curatorial turn" (O'Neill) of the 1960s in which the curator is no longer autonomous from artefact and exhibition, but instead is deeply implicated in the exhibition production process. Thus to curate was, and is, no longer simply to care-take, but to mediate, to orchestrate and to re-present.

Digital culture has produced new tools with exponentially greater capability in cataloguing, accessing and representing artefacts. This capability has led to an explosion in big data, bringing with it a suite of social, economic and political implications. One such implication is that the act of curating no longer remains the sole domain of 'the expert'. Social media have created new ways for people to select and assemble information about themselves, their lives and the world around them for display and consumption within the public arena. The capacity to orchestrate 'the self' in this arena is further enabled by digital bookmarking sites such as Pinterest and Bundler, wherein information is gathered, sorted, filtered and shared. To curate, then, extends beyond the 'presentation and representation' of Bourdieu's 'cultural intermediary' to encompass the very performativity of the self and of daily life.

From formal exhibitions to informal personal displays and from big data to pins, we invite reflections on the cultural practice of curating today. Topics can include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Exhibitions and the role of curator
  • Private/public issues in self-curatorial practices
  • The orchestration of daily life
  • The curatorial turn
  • Curation as creativity
  • The democratisation of curation
  • Curation and representation
  • Social media and the curating of self
  • Curators and autonomy
  • Big data and curation
  • Curating and design
  • Narrative and curation
  • The current market value of 'curate'
  • Relations between the artist and the curator/art and curation
  • Curating - where to next?

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 19 June 2015
  • Release date: 19 Aug. 2015
  • Editors: Bethaney Turner and Cathy Hope

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to curate@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'beginnings'

The digital spaces we encounter are increasingly stabilised and structured, organised through regulatory and commercial regimes, and populated by content and users whose lives began already networked in digital forms of production, distribution and consumption. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to explore the beginnings of these familiar and well-established, as well as emerging, contexts of digital cultures. By focussing on the beginnings, of life, of platforms, of technological encounters, of existence on social media, and so on, this issue aims to bring together scholarship around the infant and initial moments of technology use, and the processes, relations and forces that shape and are shaped by these beginnings. As digital culture becomes increasingly banal and thus less visible, studying digital beginnings may help to illuminate the varied forms of meaning, mediation, and materiality at play in configuring the familiar. Exploring beginnings may also serve to highlight paths not taken, as well as potential alternatives produced at such interstices.

Questions of beginnings feature within research traditions and theories of technology adoption, domestication and development, and so can be understood in reference to individuals and users, but also apply to the beginnings of social groups and movements, or the birth of applications, platforms, technologies or enterprises. Studying beginnings, therefore, raises questions about digital histories, trajectories and temporalities, and is open to empirical, methodological or theoretical enquiries.

By inviting contributions interested in exploring digital beginnings in this issue of M/C, possible topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

  • The mediation of the unborn and newly born
  • New parents and social media platforms
  • Case studies or examples of infant media use
  • Newbs and noobs in gaming or online communities
  • The cultural implications of new forms of computational interfaces (e.g. the Internet of Things)
  • Myths of new beginnings and technological exceptionalism (e.g. 3D printing)
  • Early historical perspectives on digital media industries or events
  • Start-up spaces or cultures
  • Alternate beginnings (eg failed and forgotten inventions)

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 14 Aug. 2015
  • Release date: 14 Oct. 2015
  • Editors: Bjorn Nansen and Tama Leaver

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to beginnings@journal.media-culture.org.au.


're-imagine'

There is a long history of working with the ideas of others, of taking a concept and re-imagining it into something that is simultaneously similar and new. Such re-imaginations are all around us; from the various interpretations of the Sherlock Holmes stories to the adjustments made, often over generations, to family recipes. Some of these efforts are the result of a creative drive to experiment and push boundaries, some efforts are inspired by changes in technology, yet others will be born of a sense of 'this can be done better' or 'differently'. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to explore the 'why' and the 'how' of re-imagining both the extraordinary and the everyday; it explores how we continue to re-imagine the activities we perform. Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Re-imagining literature
  • Re-imagining the performing arts
  • Re-imagining celluloid (film and television)
  • Re-imagining real people and events as fictions
  • Re-imagining food and food preparation
  • Re-imagining clothing and fashion
  • Re-imagination or plagiarism?
  • Re-imagination and consumerism
  • Re-imagination of religious practices
  • Re-imagining workplaces
  • Re-imagining cultural and national identities
  • Preferences for the original or the re-imagined
  • Re-imagining ourselves

And questions such as:

  • What are some of the ethical / legal implications of re-imaging the work of others?
  • How does re-imagining contribute to a broader discourse on creativity?
  • What is the relationship between an original creator and the re-imaginer of a work?

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 9 Oct. 2015
  • Release date: 9 Dec. 2015
  • Editors: Rachel Franks, Denise Rall, and Simon Dwyer

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to reimagine@journal.media-culture.org.au.