Information For Authors

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Upcoming Issues

TitleIssue EditorsSubmission DateRelease Date
'regional' Tully Barnett, Simon Dwyer, Rachel Franks, and Jane Mummery19 Apr. 201919 June 2019
'wandering' Kate Cantrell, Ariella Van Luyn, and Emma Doolan14 June 201914 Aug. 2019
'prosthetics' Crisia Constantine and Hae Seong Jang9 Aug. 20199 Oct. 2019
'time' Christina Chau and Laura Glitsos4 Oct. 20194 Dec. 2019
'dream' Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Emerald King10 Jan. 202011 Mar. 2020
'violence' Janine Gertz, Emma Maguire, Theresa Petray, and Bryan Smith21 Feb. 202022 Apr. 2020
'dissimulation' Marc Tuters and Daniël de Zeeuw17 Apr. 202017 June 2020
'revelation' Grady Hancock and Kate Murray12 June 202012 Aug. 2020
'anomaly' Chris Campanioni and Giancarlo Lombardi7 Aug. 20207 Oct. 2020

'regional'

Cultural life in the regions is part of what makes our regional centres vibrant places to live, work, create, share, and participate, as well as providing the basis for insights concerning place, space, and identity that can be divergent from those arising from other locatednesses. The experience of regional Australia is unique. John Woinarski has written that there "are places in Australia that are awe-inspiring, spectacular, mysterious; they touch our spirit and help define our nation"; but these places are complicated, for ideas of the bush or the outback are "sometimes more shifting myth than reality". This issue of M/C Journal seeks to solidify some of these understandings along with the experiences of living, working, creating, researching, or thinking in or through regional Australia. It aims to explore regional cultural constructions of these places, spaces, and identities, as well as of the communities that breathe life into these landscapes, whilst also bringing into question relations between the regional, the local and the global. This issue also aims to explore some of the opportunities for collaboration between different regions across Australia as well as between regional Australia, metropolitan areas, and the wider world, particularly through humanities and creative arts perspectives. Of especial interest are papers that highlight how cross-sector and cross-disciplinary efforts can work to promote regional areas: to tell stories about diverse communities, cultural centres, and sites of hardship, innovation, and resilience.

Areas of investigation may include but are not limited to:

  • Ways in which regional centres collaborate with metropolitan areas
  • How cross-institution collaborations benefit regional areas
  • How cross-sector collaborations benefit regional areas
  • How cross-disciplinary networks benefit regional areas
  • How the traditional ideas of regional areas are exploited and challenged
  • The importance of local history / local studies in regional areas
  • The importance of teaching activities and research activities in regional areas
  • The importance of facilitating community engagement in regional areas

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 19 Apr. 2019
  • Release date: 19 June 2019
  • Editors: Tully Barnett, Simon Dwyer, Rachel Franks, and Jane Mummery

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to regional@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'wandering'

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines ‘wandering’ as ‘going about from place to place; an aimless, slow, or pointless movement; and a shift away from the proper, normal, or usual course’. Wandering, as both a physical movement and a conceptual metaphor, can transcend the boundaries between past and present, the real and imagined, the centre and the periphery, the virtual and the actual, the human and the non-human, the private and the public, and the finite and the boundless. Wandering, by its nature, signals a shift away from linear modes of operating to a more colourful vista of experimentation, repetition, spontaneity, play, and general misrule. Historically, wanderers have been transgressive subjects who at different times have been both revered and feared, appreciated and misunderstood, and rewarded and punished for their alleged risk-taking, vagrancy, and aimlessness. Like the exile, the wanderer represents the ghost of modernity who is uprooted from home and perpetually displaced in space and time. However, not all experiences of wandering are the same. The experience of a refugee who wanders in search of a safe place to call home is different to the experience of a traveller who elects to wander while on holiday. Therefore, wandering is both an alternative mode of subjectivity and an apt metaphor for different ways of thinking, knowing, and being.

Ingrid Horrocks, in her recent book Women Wanderers and the Writing of Mobility, explains: “to be a wanderer is not quite the same as being a traveller: wandering assumes neither destination nor homecoming. The wanderer’s narrative tends to work by digression and detour rather than by a direct route. Wanderers, and their narratives, are always in danger of becoming lost. A wanderer is also someone who moves from place to place encountering a series of different people, making her a natural vehicle for explorations of sympathy and sociability, social exclusion, and loneliness.” Wandering, as Horrocks notes, is not always voluntary. People with dementia can be prone to wandering, as can children with autism. The expression ‘to have a wandering eye’ is an idiom that highlights the intersection between gendered mobility and morality. In Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), wandering is a curse that haunts the Mariner and takes it shape as a longing that he can never satisfy or fulfil. Wandering refuses to assign meaning to a single locus and instead encourages us to consider ideas and practices that are fluid, pluralistic, and intuitive.

This special issue on ‘wandering’ will explore current and emerging research on wandering practices and behaviours, methodologies, texts, and technologies. Areas of investigation may include but are not limited to:

  • Wandering and the body
  • Wandering and the environment
  • Wandering and new/emerging technologies
  • Wandering and tourist cultures, images, and identities
  • Wandering and migration, immigration, and refugeeism 
  • Wandering and mobility 
  • Wandering and diaspora 
  • Wandering and concepts of home and homelessness 
  • Wandering and urban spaces
  • Wandering and philosophy, including morality
  • Wandering and cartography, psychogeography, and affective geography
  • Wandering in art, literature, and film
  • Wandering in indigenous cultures and contexts
  • Wandering in time
  • Wandering between genres
  • Wandering as a literal, textual, physical, or imaginative phenomenon
  • Wandering as a form of protest, resistance, or ‘promiscuous’ behaviour
  • Wandering problems and stereotypes

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 14 June 2019
  • Release date: 14 Aug. 2019
  • Editors: Kate Cantrell, Ariella Van Luyn, and Emma Doolan

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to wandering@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'prosthetics'

In its most common sense, 'prosthetics' is a medical term referring to artificial devices specially designed to replace missing natural parts by reestablishing their functions within the economy of the human body. Of Ancient Greek origins, it denotes an 'addition', 'application', or 'attachment'. With a very long and rich history, the first example of a prosthesis is a big toe, dated between 950-710 BC, and thought to have belonged to an Egyptian noblewoman. The earliest historical wearer of a prosthetic limb is the Roman General Marcus Sergius, who lost his right hand in battle during the Second Punic War. However, across centuries, the technological advancement of prostheses is slow and is intertwined with the evolution of amputation surgery. Also, it is generally associated with warfare. Nowadays, the high-tech currently available sustain tremendous innovations in the productions of prosthetics, both in terms of functionality and aesthetics.

Drawing upon such medical accounts, this issue of M/C Journal seeks to expand the definition of the term outside the restoring of missing limbs. Also, it further delves into the reading of 'prosthesis' as 'application' or 'attachment' and the consequences that follow. In this regard, 'prosthetics' does not stand any longer for the replacement of a missing part, but for the addition of a new element whose function becomes desirable or even required at a later stage of evolution. Therefore, prosthetics won't refer here to the human body only, but to any structure that is subjected to some kind of transformation. Additionally, this issue opens the debate on prosthetics in relation to other fields, such as ethics, aesthetics and fine arts, fashion, animal welfare, or economics. It eventually aims to identify new interpretations and applications of the concept, along with new contexts for it.

Areas of investigation may include but are not limited to:

  • History of prosthetics; 
  • War and prosthetics; 
  • Body or facial prosthetics; 
  • Prosthetics as an extension of the body; 
  • Animal prosthetics; 
  • Ethical aspects of the production and distribution of prosthetics; 
  • Economics of prosthetics; 
  • Aesthetics of prosthetics; 
  • Prosthetics in fashion; 
  • Prosthetics in fine arts; 
  • Prosthetics in art theory; 
  • Prosthetics as a new self for new art or architecture; 
  • Prosthetics as theoretical object; 
  • Theory as prosthetics.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 9 Aug. 2019
  • Release date: 9 Oct. 2019
  • Editors: Crisia Constantine and Hae Seong Jang

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to prosthetics@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'time'

Nearly 50 years on from Alvin Toffler’s Future Shock, contemporary society finds itself in a new technological age where time is taking on a turbulent and elusive edge. We are reconciling a coexistence of distinct but simultaneous temporalities through digital media, and consequently there is a multiplicity of ways of being in time; a key aspect of our contemporaneity. According to Terry Smith, our contemporaneity is characterised “by the insistent presentness of multiple, often incompatible temporalities accompanied by the failure of all candidates that seek to provide the overriding temporal framework – be it modern, historical, spiritual, evolutionary, geological, scientific, globalizing, planetary… Everything about time these days – and therefore about place, subjectivity, and sociality – is at once intensely here, is slipping, or has become artefactual”. With Smith in mind, time today becomes evasive, contradictory and antonymous while forming a sense of urgency around the changing present. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to unpack the nuances of contemporaneity in digital society today.

Areas of investigation may include but are not limited to:

  • Contemporaneity as the condition in which we grapple the present in a time of social, political and ecological turbulence
  • Conceptualisations of time in neoliberal contexts
  • Temporal rationalisations with contemporary media and technology, including but not limited to wearable technologies and GPS tracking devices
  • Technology and efficiency
  • Somatechnical approaches to the body, media, and time
  • Speculative futures with digital media
  • Mediating the present
  • Forecasting and modelling futures in the 21st Century

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 4 Oct. 2019
  • Release date: 4 Dec. 2019
  • Editors: Christina Chau and Laura Glitsos

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to time@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'dream'

Dreams have fascinated human cultures and societies for thousands of years. What dreams are, what they look like, and what they mean have been the centre of discussions in a variety of contexts, disciplines, and situations. The very notion of ‘dream’ entails, on the one hand, something unattainable, whimsical, and even fantastic. Dreams reside, perhaps by definition, in the realm of the imaginary. Equally, dreams are inspirational; they can be representative of our innermost desires and wishes for the future. The very notion of ‘dream’ has been used metaphorically in poems, literature, film, art, and even political speeches. Transformed into their specific counterparts as nightmares, dreams give voice to our innermost fears. As agents of both dread and desire, dreams are metaphors for both our everyday and our fancies.

Drawing on the multi-faceted nature of the very concept of ‘dream’, this issue of M/C Journal seeks to expand the definition of the term, by investigating its meanings and representations across the media and cultural spectrum. ‘Dream’ is taken to be a matter of both metaphor and agency, bringing together perspectives on matters of desire, wistfulness, and meaning. The issue explores emerging research on the textual, methodological, and practical aspects of ‘dream’.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • dreams in art, literature, and film
  • dream theories
  • the aesthetics of dreams
  • the importance of 'dreaming'
  • dreams and identity
  • 'dream' as metaphor in political speeches
  • dreams and the concept of time
  • dreams and philosophy
  • dreams, fantasies, and the body
  • dreams in advertising and marketing
  • the cultural significance of dreams (including nightmares)

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 10 Jan. 2020
  • Release date: 11 Mar. 2020
  • Editors: Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Emerald King

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to dream@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'violence'

We often think of violence in its most manifest forms: war, terrorism or massacres at schools. But violence also operates in more subtle forms. Some forms of violence are easily recognised, but others are decontextualised and depoliticised through complex cultural processes of normalisation and denial (Brison). Violence can become a spectacle, an aestheticised representation, or it can be reduced to banality when its horror and trauma is refracted through everyday lives and spaces which are shaped by violent systems and ideologies (Arendt). Notions of trauma, spectatorship, testimony, and witnessing circulate through narratives of violence. Ideas of “civilisation” implicitly and explicitly reference competing discourses of violence and put them to work in damaging ways, often in service of ideals (e.g. liberalism) that mask the very violence that support them. Even for those of us who feel generally safe, violence is all around us, shaping how we live, work, think, feel, and act. However, violence is not equally inflicted or experienced throughout the world. Ultimately, feeling safe is often a marker of privilege and this safety often comes at the price of violence enacted upon others.

This issue invites responses to the theme of “violence,” understood broadly, as it operates through various social, cultural, institutional, and affective domains.

Possible considerations include (but are by no means limited to):

  • Symbolic violence and the discursive, political and social domination that shapes contemporary or historical realities.
  • Pedagogical violence and the operation of power and control over the means of intellectual, social and cultural production in spaces of learning.
  • Physical violence and the attendant damages that this entails.
  • “Cartographies of violence” (Oikawa) and the production of subjectivities, histories and realities through spatial imaginaries (and regulation).
  • The intersections of (racial, colonial, gendered, sexed, ableist) violence and the exclusions that this produces, depends on, and reifies.
  • Political violence in the wake of polarisation.
  • Technological violence and the ways in which media technologies facilitate or resist violence.
  • Violence as a subject of public interest in forms including news media, true crime, and entertainment.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 21 Feb. 2020
  • Release date: 22 Apr. 2020
  • Editors: Janine Gertz, Emma Maguire, Theresa Petray, and Bryan Smith

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to violence@journal.media-culture.org.au.