M/C - Media and Culture Home

Information For Authors

Interested in submitting to this journal? We recommend that you review the About the Journal page for the journal's section policies, as well as the Author Guidelines. Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting, or if already registered can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

 

Upcoming Issues


 
Title Issue Editors Submission Date Release Date
'beginnings'
Bjorn Nansen and Tama Leaver
14 Aug. 2015
14 Oct. 2015
're-imagine'
Rachel Franks, Denise N. Rall, and Simon Dwyer
9 Oct. 2015
9 Dec. 2015

'beginnings'

The digital spaces we encounter are increasingly stabilised and structured, organised through regulatory and commercial regimes, and populated by content and users whose lives began already networked in digital forms of production, distribution and consumption. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to explore the beginnings of these familiar and well-established, as well as emerging, contexts of digital cultures. By focussing on the beginnings, of life, of platforms, of technological encounters, of existence on social media, and so on, this issue aims to bring together scholarship around the infant and initial moments of technology use, and the processes, relations and forces that shape and are shaped by these beginnings. As digital culture becomes increasingly banal and thus less visible, studying digital beginnings may help to illuminate the varied forms of meaning, mediation, and materiality at play in configuring the familiar. Exploring beginnings may also serve to highlight paths not taken, as well as potential alternatives produced at such interstices.

Questions of beginnings feature within research traditions and theories of technology adoption, domestication and development, and so can be understood in reference to individuals and users, but also apply to the beginnings of social groups and movements, or the birth of applications, platforms, technologies or enterprises. Studying beginnings, therefore, raises questions about digital histories, trajectories and temporalities, and is open to empirical, methodological or theoretical enquiries.

By inviting contributions interested in exploring digital beginnings in this issue of M/C, possible topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

  • The mediation of the unborn and newly born
  • New parents and social media platforms
  • Case studies or examples of infant media use
  • Newbs and noobs in gaming or online communities
  • The cultural implications of new forms of computational interfaces (e.g. the Internet of Things)
  • Myths of new beginnings and technological exceptionalism (e.g. 3D printing)
  • Early historical perspectives on digital media industries or events
  • Start-up spaces or cultures
  • Alternate beginnings (eg failed and forgotten inventions)

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 14 Aug. 2015
  • Release date: 14 Oct. 2015
  • Editors: Bjorn Nansen and Tama Leaver

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to beginnings@journal.media-culture.org.au .


're-imagine'

There is a long history of working with the ideas of others, of taking a concept and re-imagining it into something that is simultaneously similar and new. Such re-imaginations are all around us; from the various interpretations of the Sherlock Holmes stories to the adjustments made, often over generations, to family recipes. Some of these efforts are the result of a creative drive to experiment and push boundaries, some efforts are inspired by changes in technology, yet others will be born of a sense of 'this can be done better' or 'differently'. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to explore the 'why' and the 'how' of re-imagining both the extraordinary and the everyday; it explores how we continue to re-imagine the activities we perform. Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Re-imagining literature
  • Re-imagining the performing arts
  • Re-imagining celluloid (film and television)
  • Re-imagining real people and events as fictions
  • Re-imagining food and food preparation
  • Re-imagining clothing and fashion
  • Re-imagination or plagiarism?
  • Re-imagination and consumerism
  • Re-imagination of religious practices
  • Re-imagining workplaces
  • Re-imagining cultural and national identities
  • Preferences for the original or the re-imagined
  • Re-imagining ourselves

And questions such as:

  • What are some of the ethical / legal implications of re-imaging the work of others?
  • How does re-imagining contribute to a broader discourse on creativity?
  • What is the relationship between an original creator and the re-imaginer of a work?

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 9 Oct. 2015
  • Release date: 9 Dec. 2015
  • Editors: Rachel Franks, Denise Rall, and Simon Dwyer

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to reimagine@journal.media-culture.org.au .