Information For Authors

Interested in submitting to this journal? We recommend that you review the About the Journal page for the journal's section policies, as well as the Author Guidelines. Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting, or if already registered can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Upcoming Issues

TitleIssue EditorsSubmission DateRelease Date
'rage' Denise N. Rall and Jo Coghlan11 Jan. 201913 Mar. 2019
'vegan' Debbie Rodan and Jane Mummery22 Feb. 201924 Apr. 2019
'regional' Tully Barnett, Simon Dwyer, Rachel Franks, and Jane Mummery19 Apr. 201919 June 2019
'wandering' Kate Cantrell, Ariella Van Luyn, and Emma Doolan14 June 201914 Aug. 2019
'prosthetics' Crisia Constantine and Laini Burton9 Aug. 20199 Oct. 2019
'time' Christina Chau and Laura Glitsos4 Oct. 20194 Dec. 2019

'rage'

The emotion of rage is most often associated with violent and uncontrolled anger. There are other definitions that appear in fandom: e.g. 'it became all the rage', a declaration of passion rather than war. Fans can adopt Beatle haircuts or miniskirts, or shaved heads, hoodies and tattoos to express their allegiances - and the punk rock subculture is most often linked to rage. Following public expressions of rage, such as football hooliganism in the UK, come the necessary reprisals, the anti-social behaviour orders (ASBOS). The expression 'rage against the machine' (RATM; a now disbanded rock band) became a popular short-cut slogan. The re-grouped Prophets of Rage declared before the 2016 US election, 'we're an elite task force of revolutionary musicians determined to confront this mountain of election year bullshit, and confront it head-on with Marshall stacks blazing.' The ABC's 30 year-music video program 'rage' chose a provocative name, in contrast to commercial platform MTV in the US.

Aristotle's Rhetorics discussed rage as a product of thumos, an anger that 'boils up' and includes both emotional and rational components. Plato's Republic elaborates that the violent reactions that follow thumos only arise when 'one feels he has been wronged', linking acts of revenge to notions of perceived injustice. Eastern philosophies also provide teachings on controlling anger. Is there a 'tipping point' between anger and rage?

In post-World War II politics, the horrific lessons of history, from both Jewish and nuclear holocausts, called for political reason. Recently, the respected columnists and commentators David Brooks and Mark Shields have called for a new 'civility' in US politics. Clearly, the violent public reactions to political events, such as the UK's Brexit, the twittering US President Donald Trump, and the rise of white supremacy in recent elections in Europe and the US indicate that rage is on the rise. Civility is a word that has been left behind, as rage has motivated attacks on synagogues, churches, immigrants, African Americans, and even random violent shootings throughout the UK, the US and Europe. Meanwhile, at the end of 2018, no fewer than three new books detail women's rage - from the #metoo movement to #blacklivesmatter to women's on-going inequities in opportunity and pay.

This issue on 'rage' seeks to discuss people, activities, and events that are driven by rage, with a focus on both productive and philosophical frameworks that can explore and may ameliorate conditions under which rage arises - on the a broad spectrum of personal, artistic, cultural, and socio-political levels.

Articles could address, but are not limited to:

  • social media and rage
  • the psychological components of rage
  • sports and rage
  • music, the arts and rage
  • politics and rage
  • rage and its links to disenfranchised populations (women, immigrants, and minority populations)
  • rage and its link to weaponry of all kinds
  • the manifestations of rage in private life (alcohol and drugs; bullying; self-harming; suicides)
  • rage as revenge; its links to perceived or real injustice
  • rage and recent movements in white supremacy
  • the possibilities for de-escalation of rage in political debate
  • the need for 'civility' in politics

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 11 Jan. 2019
  • Release date: 13 Mar. 2019
  • Editors: Denise N. Rall and Jo Coughlan

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to rage@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'vegan'

Australia has been one of the world's main meat-eating cultures with a strong normative connection of meat-eating with national identity. Despite this, Australia's National Farmers' Federation (NFF) has also noted, in 2018, that veganism and other dietary habits that minimise or avoid meat are rapidly gaining in prevalence and status throughout society. Indeed, several options are outlined in a 2018 paper in Nature - one of these is "dietary changes towards healthier, more plant-based diets" - as a way of reducing the environmental effects of the food system. Such points suggest the rise of new food norms in Australia, and that they are less the result of trends and more indicative of new practices becoming normative. New norms include being flexitarian (meat-free Mondays), reducetarian, pescatarian, vegivores, semi-vegetarian, vegetarian through to commitments to veganism - alongside commitments to broader kinds of ethical consumption practices. Despite such shifts, veganism is still often codified in Australia as aberrant and abnormal. In response to this stigma, the Reducetarian Movement (launched in 2015) claims to help "unite vegans, vegetarians, flexitarians and anyone else interested in ending factory farming" by directing individuals to eat less meat, and therefore increase their health, improve the environment and animal welfare. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to take a snapshot of the rise of plant-based eating food norms - namely, these new phenomena within predominantly meat-eating cultures. This issue also aims to explore the range of initiatives to promote plant-based eating norms and the reasons mounted for the individual and society to make it normative. Of interest are papers that highlight changing everyday dietary practices (from meat eating to plant-based) promoted and evident in supermarket routines, mainstream restaurants, festive events, government reports, media reporting, celebrity endorsements, social media influencers, crowdfunding initiatives, and activist campaigns.

Areas of investigation or themes may include but are not limited to:

  • Identity transitions around veganism, vegetarianism and reducetarianism
  • Local and/or global initiatives to promote veganism, vegetarianism and/or reducetarianism
  • Alternative plant-based food norms within meat-eating cultures
  • The ethical considerations around not eating meat
  • How influential are environmental claims about changing to a plant-based diet
  • How convincing are health claims about changing to a plant-based diet
  • How do animal welfare campaigns attempt to sway individuals to change to plant-based diets

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 22 Feb. 2019
  • Release date: 24 Apr. 2019
  • Editors: Debbie Rodan and Jane Mummery

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to vegan@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'regional'

Cultural life in the regions is part of what makes our regional centres vibrant places to live, work, create, share, and participate, as well as providing the basis for insights concerning place, space, and identity that can be divergent from those arising from other locatednesses. The experience of regional Australia is unique. John Woinarski has written that there "are places in Australia that are awe-inspiring, spectacular, mysterious; they touch our spirit and help define our nation"; but these places are complicated, for ideas of the bush or the outback are "sometimes more shifting myth than reality". This issue of M/C Journal seeks to solidify some of these understandings along with the experiences of living, working, creating, researching, or thinking in or through regional Australia. It aims to explore regional cultural constructions of these places, spaces, and identities, as well as of the communities that breathe life into these landscapes, whilst also bringing into question relations between the regional, the local and the global. This issue also aims to explore some of the opportunities for collaboration between different regions across Australia as well as between regional Australia, metropolitan areas, and the wider world, particularly through humanities and creative arts perspectives. Of especial interest are papers that highlight how cross-sector and cross-disciplinary efforts can work to promote regional areas: to tell stories about diverse communities, cultural centres, and sites of hardship, innovation, and resilience.

Areas of investigation may include but are not limited to:

  • Ways in which regional centres collaborate with metropolitan areas
  • How cross-institution collaborations benefit regional areas
  • How cross-sector collaborations benefit regional areas
  • How cross-disciplinary networks benefit regional areas
  • How the traditional ideas of regional areas are exploited and challenged
  • The importance of local history / local studies in regional areas
  • The importance of teaching activities and research activities in regional areas
  • The importance of facilitating community engagement in regional areas

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 19 Apr. 2019
  • Release date: 9 June 2019
  • Editors: Tully Barnett, Simon Dwyer, Rachel Franks, and Jane Mummery

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to regional@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'wandering'

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines ‘wandering’ as ‘going about from place to place; an aimless, slow, or pointless movement; and a shift away from the proper, normal, or usual course’. Wandering, as both a physical movement and a conceptual metaphor, can transcend the boundaries between past and present, the real and imagined, the centre and the periphery, the virtual and the actual, the human and the non-human, the private and the public, and the finite and the boundless. Wandering, by its nature, signals a shift away from linear modes of operating to a more colourful vista of experimentation, repetition, spontaneity, play, and general misrule. Historically, wanderers have been transgressive subjects who at different times have been both revered and feared, appreciated and misunderstood, and rewarded and punished for their alleged risk-taking, vagrancy, and aimlessness. Like the exile, the wanderer represents the ghost of modernity who is uprooted from home and perpetually displaced in space and time. However, not all experiences of wandering are the same. The experience of a refugee who wanders in search of a safe place to call home is different to the experience of a traveller who elects to wander while on holiday. Therefore, wandering is both an alternative mode of subjectivity and an apt metaphor for different ways of thinking, knowing, and being.

Ingrid Horrocks, in her recent book Women Wanderers and the Writing of Mobility, explains: “to be a wanderer is not quite the same as being a traveller: wandering assumes neither destination nor homecoming. The wanderer’s narrative tends to work by digression and detour rather than by a direct route. Wanderers, and their narratives, are always in danger of becoming lost. A wanderer is also someone who moves from place to place encountering a series of different people, making her a natural vehicle for explorations of sympathy and sociability, social exclusion, and loneliness.” Wandering, as Horrocks notes, is not always voluntary. People with dementia can be prone to wandering, as can children with autism. The expression ‘to have a wandering eye’ is an idiom that highlights the intersection between gendered mobility and morality. In Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), wandering is a curse that haunts the Mariner and takes it shape as a longing that he can never satisfy or fulfil. Wandering refuses to assign meaning to a single locus and instead encourages us to consider ideas and practices that are fluid, pluralistic, and intuitive.

This special issue on ‘wandering’ will explore current and emerging research on wandering practices and behaviours, methodologies, texts, and technologies. Areas of investigation may include but are not limited to:

  • Wandering and the body
  • Wandering and the environment
  • Wandering and new/emerging technologies
  • Wandering and tourist cultures, images, and identities
  • Wandering and migration, immigration, and refugeeism 
  • Wandering and mobility 
  • Wandering and diaspora 
  • Wandering and concepts of home and homelessness 
  • Wandering and urban spaces
  • Wandering and philosophy, including morality
  • Wandering and cartography, psychogeography, and affective geography
  • Wandering in art, literature, and film
  • Wandering in indigenous cultures and contexts
  • Wandering in time
  • Wandering between genres
  • Wandering as a literal, textual, physical, or imaginative phenomenon
  • Wandering as a form of protest, resistance, or ‘promiscuous’ behaviour
  • Wandering problems and stereotypes

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 14 June 2019
  • Release date: 14 Aug. 2019
  • Editors: Kate Cantrell, Ariella Van Luyn, and Emma Doolan

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to wandering@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'prosthetics'

Call for papers coming soon...

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 9 Aug. 2019
  • Release date: 9 Oct. 2019
  • Editors: Crisia Constantine and Laini Burton

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to prosthetics@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'time'

Nearly 50 years on from Alvin Toffler’s Future Shock, contemporary society finds itself in a new technological age where time is taking on a turbulent and elusive edge. We are reconciling a coexistence of distinct but simultaneous temporalities through digital media, and consequently there is a multiplicity of ways of being in time; a key aspect of our contemporaneity. According to Terry Smith, our contemporaneity is characterised “by the insistent presentness of multiple, often incompatible temporalities accompanied by the failure of all candidates that seek to provide the overriding temporal framework – be it modern, historical, spiritual, evolutionary, geological, scientific, globalizing, planetary… Everything about time these days – and therefore about place, subjectivity, and sociality – is at once intensely here, is slipping, or has become artefactual”. With Smith in mind, time today becomes evasive, contradictory and antonymous while forming a sense of urgency around the changing present. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to unpack the nuances of contemporaneity in digital society today.

Areas of investigation may include but are not limited to:

  • Contemporaneity as the condition in which we grapple the present in a time of social, political and ecological turbulence
  • Conceptualisations of time in neoliberal contexts
  • Temporal rationalisations with contemporary media and technology, including but not limited to wearable technologies and GPS tracking devices
  • Technology and efficiency
  • Somatechnical approaches to the body, media, and time
  • Speculative futures with digital media
  • Mediating the present
  • Forecasting and modelling futures in the 21st Century

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 4 Oct. 2019
  • Release date: 4 Dec. 2019
  • Editors: Christina Chau and Laura Glitsos

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to time@journal.media-culture.org.au.