Information For Authors

Interested in submitting to this journal? We recommend that you review the About the Journal page for the journal's section policies, as well as the Author Guidelines. Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting, or if already registered can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Upcoming Issues

TitleIssue EditorsSubmission DateRelease Date
're-imagine' Rachel Franks, Denise N. Rall, and Simon Dwyer9 Oct. 20159 Dec. 2015
'corporeal' Anna Lavis and Karin Eli15 Jan. 20166 Apr. 2016
'mentor' Angelina Ambrosetti and Susan Davis 27 Feb. 20164 May 2016
'place' Christina Ballico and Allan Watson22 Apr. 201622 June 2016
'transform' Jane O'Sullivan, Anne Pender, Jeremy Fisher, and Yvonne Griggs17 June 201617 Aug. 2016

're-imagine'

There is a long history of working with the ideas of others, of taking a concept and re-imagining it into something that is simultaneously similar and new. Such re-imaginations are all around us; from the various interpretations of the Sherlock Holmes stories to the adjustments made, often over generations, to family recipes. Some of these efforts are the result of a creative drive to experiment and push boundaries, some efforts are inspired by changes in technology, yet others will be born of a sense of 'this can be done better' or 'differently'. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to explore the 'why' and the 'how' of re-imagining both the extraordinary and the everyday; it explores how we continue to re-imagine the activities we perform. Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Re-imagining literature
  • Re-imagining the performing arts
  • Re-imagining celluloid (film and television)
  • Re-imagining real people and events as fictions
  • Re-imagining food and food preparation
  • Re-imagining clothing and fashion
  • Re-imagination or plagiarism?
  • Re-imagination and consumerism
  • Re-imagination of religious practices
  • Re-imagining workplaces
  • Re-imagining cultural and national identities
  • Preferences for the original or the re-imagined
  • Re-imagining ourselves

And questions such as:

  • What are some of the ethical / legal implications of re-imaging the work of others?
  • How does re-imagining contribute to a broader discourse on creativity?
  • What is the relationship between an original creator and the re-imaginer of a work?

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 9 Oct. 2015
  • Release date: 9 Dec. 2015
  • Editors: Rachel Franks, Denise Rall, and Simon Dwyer

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to reimagine@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'corporeal'

From reflections on embodiment to the material and affective turns, theoretical approaches to the body are much debated across a range of conceptual and real world contexts. Drawing on and threading across these debates, this issue will focus on corporeality by engaging with the objects that we encounter in day-to-day life. Such objects interact with, make and shape what a body is and does. They illuminate its thresholds and boundaries, possibilities and limits. As such, objects 'tell' often-surprising tales about embodied being and offer a prism through which to unsettle familiar discourses on the body. We invite essays that engage with objects to experiment with new ways in which to conceptualize and write corporeality, its potentialities, edges and frailties.

Areas of investigation and focal questions may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is 'a body', and where do its boundaries, thresholds or intersections lie?
  • How do the objects we encounter in everyday life shape or create bodies? (Examples may include medical, structural, technological, sexual, artistic, or edible objects, among others.)
  • How might such 'embodied objects' further reflections on the corporeal and its potentialities or limits?
  • Materiality and corporeality: How are bodies made material and/or immaterial?
  • How might we write or rewrite the body through focussing on a single object with which the body interacts?
  • Cyber-corporeality: how do we define corporeality in a virtual space, or through virtual objects and encounters?
  • Absences and presences: how do objects foreground the body? How do they make the body retreat into the background?

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 15 Jan. 2016
  • Release date: 16 Mar. 2016
  • Editors: Anna Lavis and Karin Eli

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to corporeal@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'mentor'

Many of the most popular reality television shows utilise the concept of a mentor in their program formats. Masterchef Australia, for example, utilises well-known food experts as mentors to assist in the culinary development of amateur cooks. In the modern world outside of reality TV, most people have experienced mentorship at some stage of their lives. Thus the phenomenon of the mentor permeates our everyday lives in both a conscious and unconscious sense. The term mentor first emerged in Greek mythology, when Odysseus entrusted his son Telemachus to his friend Mentor for guidance, support and care. Traditionally the role of a mentor is that of nurturing, guiding, protecting, coaching, and supporting another, whether this be in personal or professional circumstances. Since Telemachus's experience of mentoring was reported in Homer's Odyssey, the conception of the act of mentorship and the role of mentors has grown in relevance within modern society. Mentoring consists of a series of social, emotional and intellectual interactions, thus the role of a mentor is to engage in such interactions and utilise them to assist another in developing particular qualities, skills or knowledge. The concept of mentorship has proven readily transferable to a range of contemporary contexts including media and culture, and today mentors are found in a variety of media and cultural contexts.

This issue of M/C Journal explores the concept of the mentor and how mentors and mentorship are portrayed and enacted in our modern world. Authors are invited to investigate the phenomenon of the mentor by exploring, but are not limited to, the following ideas:

  • The mentor and the culture of excellence
  • The portrayal of mentors and mentorship in popular culture
  • Mentor vs. judge: Food TV and magazine 'agony aunts'
  • The dark side of mentoring
  • Mentoring in multiples
  • Reality television and the role of the mentor
  • The modern mentor
  • The family mentor
  • The language of mentoring in contemporary society

And questions such as:

  • Is mentoring the new black?
  • How does mentoring relate to performance management?
  • How does mentorship fit with the competitive ethos?

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 27 Feb. 2016
  • Release date: 27 Apr. 2016
  • Editors: Angelina Ambrosetti and Susan Davis

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to mentor@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'place'

The ways in which artists, musicians, filmmakers and other creative practitioners perceive, navigate and represent 'place' in their work is complex and multifaceted. Further, place-based conditions also influence the ways in which creative activity occurs in particular locales, raising questions regarding the role of history, economics, attitudes towards and perceptions of particular forms of arts and culture, shared social and creative contexts, and the geographical location of places, in shaping and fostering creativity. While the relationship between place and creative practice is now widely recognised across the social sciences, it remains poorly conceptualised at the level of specific forms of artistic and creative practices and creative industries. The aim of this issue is to therefore bring together scholarship from across a range of disciplines that is concerned with the relationship between place, broadly defined, and creativity, also broadly defined.

We invite submissions centred on, but not limited to, the following areas of enquiry:

  • How factors related to place effect the performance of a wide range of creative practices, including the materiality, history, and cultural and societal aspects of particular locales.
  • How place is represented and reflected in music, literature, film, and across a wide range of other creative products and outputs, across a range of spatial scales.
  • How artists simultaneously navigate both 'real' and virtual 'places' in their work.
  • How creative practice is both situated in, and networked across, particular locales.
  • How mapping creative activity can help better understand situated, place-specific creative practices, clusters and networks.
  • The formation of creative communities of artists, musicians, film makers, and other creatives with and beyond particular places.
  • Biographies of individuals and historical accounts of creative scenes that emphasise the role of place in fostering and shaping creativity.

We welcome both empirically-grounded as well theoretically-led contributions, but all articles should seek to draw clear links between place-based social, economic and material conditions and creative practice, creative industries and communities, and creative products.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 22 Apr. 2016
  • Release date: 22 June 2016
  • Editors: Christina Ballico and Allan Watson

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to place@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'transform'

In a cultural context of rapid change, the pressure is on to transform bodies, material possessions and the environment, simply to keep up. Self-improvement, home renovation, behaviour modification, makeovers, extreme or otherwise are sold as essential components of a responsible, fully functioning, and appropriately aspirational member of society. Transformation may involve the pursuit of something quite new, or take the form of a nostalgic restitution of an earlier state. It may be the result of an intense, life-changing experience. Whatever form it takes, to transform is driven by a desire for something better. Transformation is a kind of alchemy or metamorphosis, but there is no secrecy here, or intimations of magic. Rather, the change is quite public, a cause for celebration, and the process itself laid bare as a source of fascination.

For the gods in Ovid's Metamorphoses, transformation was doled out to mortals as punishment for greed, narcissism, and other such flaws and misdeeds. In pantomime, the transformation, or disclosing scene, had the lead actors transform into the players for the comic harlequinade while in full view of the audience. The concept of Renaissance self-fashioning, as discussed by Stephen Greenblatt (Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare, 1980), details how selected sixteenth-century 'gentlemen' decisively transformed their subjectivity in an early process of identity formation. Today, like the robots ('Transformers') in the film of the same name (dir. Michael Bay, 2007), proponents of popular culture have many means by which to transform themselves, and the world.

This issue of M/C Journal seeks critical and creative works that investigate the impetus to transform, its current and historical manifestations in a reflexive process of self-fashioning and manufacturing, and its links to a cultural will to modify or control 'the natural'.

Topics of discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • Transformation into another shape or form as a punitive metamorphosis, or a kind of penitence
  • Change to the function or 'nature' of human and non-human life and environment
  • Transformed gardens, zoological and botanical
  • The redeployment of technologies and energy sources
  • Retro as the new 'new'
  • Renaissance self-fashioning
  • The transformation of characters and/or players in theatrical performance
  • Life-changing moments
  • Makeovers
  • Alterations of genre, within and across textual forms, including visual, prose and audio/sound narratives
  • The role of shame and/or fame
  • Tales of transformation
  • Reconfiguring gender and sexuality
  • Transformative literature in the public and/or private sphere

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 17 June 2016
  • Release date: 17 Aug. 2016
  • Editors: Jane O’Sullivan, Anne Pender, Jeremy Fisher, and Yvonne Griggs

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to transform@journal.media-culture.org.au.