Information For Authors

Interested in submitting to this journal? We recommend that you review the About the Journal page for the journal's section policies, as well as the Author Guidelines. Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting, or if already registered can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Upcoming Issues

TitleIssue EditorsSubmission DateRelease Date
'protest' Scott East and Ben Hightower15 June 201815 Aug. 2018
'walking' Amy Mead and Melanie Pryor10 Aug. 201810 Oct. 2018
'nineties' Jay Daniel Thompson and Sally Breen5 Oct. 20185 Dec. 2018

'protest'

Protest signals disagreement or dissatisfaction. It is a means of self-expression in opposition to particular events, policies or situations. This issue of M/C Journal is inspired by developments in contemporary protest: the scale and scope of protests, law and the policing and censorship of protest, and emerging spaces, methods and sites of protest.

In this issue we host a discussion crossing disciplinary, geographic, and conceptual boundaries which involves a range of academic, activist, and artistic voices on the utility, significance and efficacy of historical and contemporary protest movements.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Protest solidarities (protest institutions, protest culture, 'professional' protestors, protest as residence, national and global protest movements)
  • Counter-protest (protest rivals and conflicting protest ideologies)
  • Protest and dissention (resistance and discordant communities)
  • Policing protest (changing legal cultures, censorship, public space, and penalties)
  • Protest and activism (challenges and success of societal reform: environment, polity, economics, governance)
  • Literature, art and culture (protest art, culture-jamming, performance, documentaries & film)
  • Protest organisation (protest form and function)
  • Protest and the media (media as protest, representation of protest)
  • Not-In-My-BackYard (NIMBY) oppositions
  • Emerging forms and typologies (hologram protest)
  • Translation of protest (understanding protest, inter/intra-cultural exchanges, protest across borders, protest narratives)
  • Evaluating protest (utility, efficacy, viability, functionality)
  • Technology and protest ('non-lethal' weapons, social media, online activism)

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 15 June 2018
  • Release date: 15 Aug. 2018
  • Editors: Scott East and Ben Hightower

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to protest@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'walking'

Why do we walk? Walking traverses boundaries of the physical, political, artistic, narrated, literary, and psychological, and can be deployed as a complex practice in an increasingly digitised world. In this issue, we examine the contemporary practices and representations of walking. We encourage work with an interest in the hybrid, the interdisciplinary, the intersectional; that looks to fields as diverse as feminist studies, life writing, nature writing, anthropology and fictocriticism.

We think walking can be an act, a response, a methodology, a transgression. Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Walking and the body
  • Walking and selfhood
  • Walking and gendered spaces
  • Walking and urban spaces
  • Walking and feminism
  • Walking and mobility/disability
  • Walking and mental illness
  • Walking as meditation, contemplative walking
  • Walking as methodology, walking as artistic practice
  • Walking and the Anthropocene
  • Walking and the literary
  • Walking as resistance
  • Walking in film
  • Walking and cartography, affective geographies, psychogeography
  • Walking and nature writing

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 10 Aug. 2018
  • Release date: 10 Oct. 2018
  • Editors: Amy Mead and Melanie Pryor

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to walking@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'nineties'

In 2016, The New York Times published an article entitled "The Return of the '90s". In that article, journalist Alexander Fury wrote: "for those who lived through it, there was a sense of transience, of not only a century but of a millennium drawing to a close. Of both relentlessly looking forward to the promise of the brave and the new and back via an exhaustive sputtering of revivals."

Fury is correct: the 1990s was a transient, eclectic, unpredictable decade. The recent revival of the series Twin Peaks (originally screened in 1990-1) suggests that this decade has made a kind of "comeback", at least in the realm of popular culture.

This issue of M/C Journal will revisit the period spanning 1990 to 1999. Areas of investigation could include:

  • Shutting down the 20th Century: where did the 1980s end and the 1990s begin?
  • Paranoia: Y2K and otherwise tilting into the new millennium
  • Technological insurgence and the widespread emergence of the Internet
  • Grunge, alternative subcultures and 'Generation X'
  • Hybridity, globalisation and popular culture
  • High art/low art collapse and genre fluidity
  • The function of retro and nostalgia in, and about, the 1990s

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 5 Oct. 2018
  • Release date: 5 Dec. 2018
  • Editors: Jay Daniel Thompson and Sally Breen

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to nineties@journal.media-culture.org.au.