Information For Authors

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Upcoming Issues

Title Issue Editors Submission Date Release Date
'monster' Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Gwyneth Peaty 6 Aug. 2021 6 Oct. 2021
'conspiracy' Alexia Maddox, Stephanie Baker, Naomi Smith, and Clare Southerton 7 Jan. 2022 9 Mar. 2022
'fungible' Laura Glitsos, James Hall, and Jess Taylor 18 Feb. 2022 20 Apr. 2022
'cities' Christina Ballico and Allan Watson 15 Apr. 2022 15 June 2022
'heritage' Lloyd Carpenter and Paul Moon 10 June 2022 10 Aug. 2022
'fashion' Emerald L. King and Monika Winarnita 5 Aug. 2022 5 Oct. 2022
'thread' Christina Chau and Sky Croeser 30 Sep. 2022 30 Nov. 2022
'uniform' Lisa J. Hackett and Jo Coughlan 6 Jan. 2023 8 Mar. 2023

'monster'

Since the earliest legends and mythological tales, the figure of the monster has functioned as an oppositional force against which humans define themselves. As Margaret Atwood points out, “heroes need monsters to establish their heroic credentials. You need something scary to overcome”. More recently, however, our understanding of the monster has become more complex. They are no longer ‘out there’ but ‘in here’; “they live inside us” (Stephen King). In this issue we approach the concept and figure of the monster with fresh curiosity. What makes something ‘monstrous’?  Who are our monsters? What anxieties do they reflect back upon us? As a point of intimate identification, why are so many people (including Kanye) now embracing the monster as an aspect of their identity?

Topics and areas of discussion might include, but are not limited to:

  • Representations of monsters in popular culture (film, TV, video games, music, comics, etc.)
  • Monsters in literature and poetry
  • Monstrosity as a critical concept
  • Monster ontologies and representations (from the body to the self…)
  • The monster and identity
  • Monsters, history, and folklore
  • Evolving monster metaphors
  • Monsters and genre (from fantasy to science fiction and beyond)
  • ‘Monstrous’ political figures
  • Monstrosity and the body
  • The monstrous nature of the media
  • Notions of ‘the monster’ within postcolonial discourses
  • Monsters and ‘the end of the world’
  • Monsters, science, and culture
  • Monsters and the Gothic/horror
  • Disease ‘as monster’

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 6 Aug. 2021
  • Release date: 6 Oct. 2021
  • Editors: Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Gwyneth Peaty

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to monster@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'conspiracy'

Conspiracies have assumed broad cultural and political resonance over the last century (Butter and Knight). While often framed as an American problem (Melley), social media has contributed to their global reach (Gerts et al.). Bruns, Harrington, and Hurcombe have traced the contemporary movement of conspiracy theories into the cultural mainstream. They identify the networked and cross-platform nature of conspiracy theory movement from fringe conspiracist groups on social media platforms such as Facebook through their greater uptake in more diverse communities and to substantial amplification by celebrities, sports stars, and media outlets. Consequently, conspiracy theories that were once the product of subcultural groups, have increasingly mixed into popular and authoritative media (Marwick and Lewis) and entertainment (Hyzen and Van den Bulck; Van den Bulck and Hyzen).

The illusion of neat segmentation between the sites of conspiracy theorising and the mainstream media has vanished. As conspiracy theories push into the mainstream, they generate material engagement with government and social institutions as demonstrated in the 6 January 2021 storming of the US Capitol (Moskalenko and McCauley) and the COVID-19 pandemic (Baker, Wade, and Walsh). While conspiracies flourish online, this issue also aims to highlight the affective and aesthetic dimensions of conspiracy theories; including how the sensory and affective capacities of the body work alongside seemingly ‘rational’ informational practices and platform logics.

This issue welcomes submissions on four broad themes:

  • Theorising conspiracy in digital contexts
  • Methodological approaches to conspiracy research in digital contexts
  • Contemporary conspiracies that span the body and digital environments
  • The consequences of digital conspiracies

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 7 Jan. 2022
  • Release date: 9 Mar. 2022
  • Editors: Alexia Maddox, Stephanie Baker, Naomi Smith, and Clare Southerton

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to conspiracy@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'fungible'

The word fungible comes from the Latin fungibilis. The Latin verb fungi means ‘to perform’. Something that is fungible is mutually interchangeable with any other ‘thing’ of its kind—one thing can ‘perform’ in place of the other. Digital culture has so far thrived on fungibility: cryptocurrencies, image files, video files, audio files, and beyond can be replicated and shared ad nauseam and each iteration holds the same exchange value.

However, only recently, thanks to blockchain technology, digital culture has gone non-fungible. Some blockchain cryptocurrencies, such as Ethereum, now offer technology that also supports the storing of extra information that essentially marks certain tokens as completely and utterly unique. These are called non-fungible tokens, or NFTs for short.

In March of 2021, this phenomenon burst into the cultural consciousness with the news that a blockchain entrepreneur purchased a single piece of digital art as an NFT for more than 69 million US dollars. Blockchain technology has revolutionised the notions of fungibility and non-fungibility in digital culture and has far-reaching implications for a range of phenomena that we invite authors to explore, such as (but not limited to):

  • The Art World
  • Digital Art
  • Non-Fungible Tokens
  • Digital Ownership
  • Digital Commerce and Society
  • Digital Economy/e-Commerce
  • Fandom and Collecting
  • Digital/Crypto Currencies
  • Fungible Representations
  • Intellectual Property
  • Data & Privacy
  • Collectibles
  • Ticketing
  • Games and Gaming
  • Virtual Worlds
  • Music
  • Film
  • Memes
  • Sports
  • Fashion
  • Pornography
  • Simulacra and Simulation

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 18 Feb. 2022
  • Release date: 20 Apr. 2022
  • Editors: Laura Glitsos, James Hall, and Jess Taylor

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to fungible@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'cities'

Over the past 20 years, interest in the ways in which cities might be re-imagined and place-branded through specific creative and cultural identities and activities has increased exponentially (Landry; Andersson; Evans; Grodach), with urban policy-makers in particular seeking to find ways to leverage these identities to drive a range of urban development, economic, heritage, and tourism initiatives (Richards; Baker; Martinez; Ballico and Watson). In turn, significant attention has been given to the vital contribution creative workers make to the creative, cultural, and economic fabric of cities, with policies aimed at attracting these workers becoming a central tenet of many creative city strategies (Florida). To this end, urban development strategies prefaced on the enactment of a range of ‘creative’ and ‘cultural’ frameworks are commonplace in cities across the world. Examples of this include the UNESCO Creative Cities Network, which encompasses creative sectors as diverse as Crafts and Folk Art, Design, Film, Gastronomy, Literature, Media Arts, and Music (Ballico and Carter), as well as other sector-specific frameworks such as the global music cities movement (Baker; Ballico and Watson). Considering the emergence, circulation, and adoption of these policy frameworks, as well as more broadly the ways in which creative and cultural identities can be leveraged through place activation strategies, we invite contributions that provide, although are not limited to:

  • Critical evaluations of city-specific impacts of creative and cultural cities frameworks and their capacity to support urban regeneration and social and economic development, including the UNESCO Creative Cities Network, other international or national frameworks such as City of Culture awards, as well as localised initiatives.
  • Critical appraisals of city-specific cultural policies and regulatory frameworks which might support and/or inhibit particular forms of creative and cultural initiatives and activities., both in the short and long term.
  • Critical accounts of the reimaging of cities through specific cultural sectors or particular creative and artistic works or artists, in particular in ways which engage place activation and/or creative documentation strategies.
  • Consideration of the ways in which creative, cultural, and music city policy frameworks might be re-worked, re-imagined, or re-invigorated in order to provide more equitable forms of urban, social, and economic development in cities post the COVID-19 pandemic.

We are particularly interested in receiving submissions from scholars working outside of, or otherwise researching cities outside of, the global west, and submissions on cities that are under-represented in the extant literature. Providing accounts of a geographically diverse range of cities is a priority of this issue.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition). It is our intention to invite selected authors to extend these papers at a later date for the purposes of producing an edited volume.

Details

  • Article deadline: 15 Apr. 2022
  • Release date: 15 June 2022
  • Editors: Christina Ballico and Allan Watson

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to cities@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'heritage'

Heritage has emerged as a word that has a variety of meanings for people of different cultures, ages, and education. Fulton states that traditional approaches to Heritage create a method of building national narratives, collective memories, and identities that acts on society to constitute and institutionalise social practice and value systems to align with political agendas. For many, Heritage is notable monuments, sites, buildings, and artefacts, protected from and displayed for the public, with an entrance fee and guide book attached. For others of a more cynical mein, Heritage is an ill-defined concept lacking the discipline and structure of History, assuming definitions which change with situations and ideologies. Hubbard and Lilley highlight the reduction of the concept to merely anything ‘designed to create something which people will consider worth visiting and spending money on', while Kevin Walsh notes the politicisation and nationalisation of the idea, seeing how ‘the collection and exhibition of artefacts and structures that the political leaders of a nation believed to highlight the achievements and superiority of the country became important unifiers for society and the resulting face of heritage’. Any consideration of Heritage in the twenty-first century must, therefore, consider the evolving and dynamic changes both in the past and into the future.

We seek writing on Heritage, challenging traditional ideas, definitions, and narratives, for this issue of M/C Journal. Approaches to Heritage may include, but are not limited to:

  • Defining Heritage
  • Dark Heritage
  • Indigenous Heritage
  • Conflict Heritage
  • Heritage landscapes
  • Memorialising Heritage
  • Colonial Heritage
  • Sporting Heritage
  • Intangible Heritage
  • Natural Heritage
  • Sequestrated Heritage
  • Class Heritage
  • Constructed Heritage
  • Popular Heritage
  • Architectural Heritage
  • Interpreting Heritage
  • Imagined Heritage

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 10 June 2022
  • Release date: 10 Aug. 2022
  • Editors: Lloyd Carpenter and Paul Moon

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to heritage@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'fashion'

In the age of Instafame and TikTok influencers it is easy to view fashion as something trivial or fleeting. In this issue we encourage contributors to look at fashion seriously, and from all angles – from the latest trends to the construction of bodies and identity.

With much of the world’s textile and clothing production located in Asia the theme lends itself to a wide range of articles across all aspects of ‘fashion’, such as the slow fashion movement, garment construction, haute couture, cosplay and ‘bounding’, and gender expression through clothing.

‘Fashion’ also refers to the manner in which something is done, or how things are created. From this perspective, we welcome articles that engage with how bodies are re-fashioned, for example, through body modifications, surgical tourism, tattooing and piercing.

Topics and areas of discussion might include but are not limited to:

  • How is gender fashioned in Asia?
  • What lies behind the textile industry?
  • How are bodies shaped, changed and constructed?
  • Cosplay and theories of embodiment
  • Cosplay costume construction
  • China cotton
  • Fashioning the body
  • Fashioning gender
  • Slow fashion vs. fast fashion
  • Street fashion and performativity
  • Gender expression through clothing
  • Clothing and mental health
  • Clothing the gaps
  • Fashion as a form of protest or resistance

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 5 Aug. 2022
  • Release date: 5 Oct. 2022
  • Editors: Emerald L. King and Monika Winarnita

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to fashion@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'thread'

Craft and textiles artists have long been associated with expressions of protest and activism on issues around gender, patriarchy, ethnicity, and class. The connections of craft and textiles with subversion is partly due to these practices being historically linked to the feminine and domesticity. As professed by Rozsika Parker in The Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine, “to know the history of embroidery is to know the history of women”, because expectations around art and aesthetics were an expression of patriarchal stratification.

More broadly, beyond embroidery, craft and textiles in the twenty-first century continue to be vehicles for political expression and identity politics beyond gender binaries, albeit in new ways. Perhaps this is partly because, as suggested by Charlotte Gould, “if women artists at the turn of the century have inherited these struggles, their identity is no longer defined simply by a shared female experience”. Contemporary practitioners are communing online to share resources, ideas, and creations with one another, and interweaving these communications with their craft to the point that tools of communication become integral to modes of making. The current global pandemic has, in some cases, increased the potential of craft, textile, and sewing communities that use social media platforms to find new ways to express identity, community, subversion, and mutual aid through their craft. 

This issue is interested in the intersections between craft, digital technologies, and politics in the twenty-first century. Topics and areas of discussion may include but are not limited to:

  • Zoom knit-alongs
  • Communities and threads online dedicated to makers of craft and textiles
  • Queer sewcialists
  • Body positive sewing communities
  • Attempts to build anti-racist craft communities online
  • Stitch n Bitch meetups online
  • Sewing communities on social media
  • Online DIY craft cultures
  • Textiles as an expression of socio-political identities
  • Craftivism

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 30 Sep. 2022
  • Release date: 30 Nov. 2022
  • Editors: Christina Chau and Sky Croeser

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to thread@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'uniform'

Uniforms have been a ubiquitous part of daily life in the western world for the last couple of centuries. In Australia, about half of all Australians wear some sort of uniform, which serves to identify employees of an organisation in the public sphere. In doing so, uniforms overlay the identity of the individual with that of the organisation. However, this can be problematic as uniforms, in comparison to fashion, are often slow to evolve, especially when social norms and expectations change. This has led to the charge that uniforms can sometimes be ‘frozen in the past’, embodying ideals and ideology of a bygone era. This can be seen in the recent debates over the depiction of gender in uniforms, especially those worn in school or in jobs that have been defined as ‘feminine’ or ‘masculine’. The concept of uniforms does not only encompass the dress codes set by organisations. Some uniforms arise organically within social groups. Here, individuals seek to define their membership of a group through the conscious selection of, and wearing of, similarly styled or coloured clothing that represents for them a social uniform. Punk is an example here. Hence, the dress style of subcultures is generally depicted as a kind of uniform. This issue of M/C Journal will critically examine the meanings, choices, and changes in uniforms, in both their contemporary and historic guises.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 6 Jan. 2023
  • Release date: 8 Mar. 2023
  • Editors: Lisa J. Hackett and Jo Coughlan

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to uniform@journal.media-culture.org.au.