Information For Authors

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Upcoming Issues

Title Issue Editors Submission Date Release Date
'fashion' Emerald L. King and Monika Winarnita 5 Aug. 2022 5 Oct. 2022
'thread' Christina Chau and Sky Croeser 30 Sep. 2022 30 Nov. 2022
'uniform' Lisa J. Hackett and Jo Coghlan 6 Jan. 2023 8 Mar. 2023

'fashion'

In the age of Instafame and TikTok influencers it is easy to view fashion as something trivial or fleeting. In this issue we encourage contributors to look at fashion seriously, and from all angles – from the latest trends to the construction of bodies and identity.

With much of the world’s textile and clothing production located in Asia the theme lends itself to a wide range of articles across all aspects of ‘fashion’, such as the slow fashion movement, garment construction, haute couture, cosplay and ‘bounding’, and gender expression through clothing.

‘Fashion’ also refers to the manner in which something is done, or how things are created. From this perspective, we welcome articles that engage with how bodies are re-fashioned, for example, through body modifications, surgical tourism, tattooing and piercing.

Topics and areas of discussion might include but are not limited to:

  • How is gender fashioned in Asia?
  • What lies behind the textile industry?
  • How are bodies shaped, changed and constructed?
  • Cosplay and theories of embodiment
  • Cosplay costume construction
  • China cotton
  • Fashioning the body
  • Fashioning gender
  • Slow fashion vs. fast fashion
  • Street fashion and performativity
  • Gender expression through clothing
  • Clothing and mental health
  • Clothing the gaps
  • Fashion as a form of protest or resistance

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 5 Aug. 2022
  • Release date: 5 Oct. 2022
  • Editors: Emerald L. King and Monika Winarnita

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to fashion@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'thread'

Craft and textiles artists have long been associated with expressions of protest and activism on issues around gender, patriarchy, ethnicity, and class. The connections of craft and textiles with subversion is partly due to these practices being historically linked to the feminine and domesticity. As professed by Rozsika Parker in The Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine, “to know the history of embroidery is to know the history of women”, because expectations around art and aesthetics were an expression of patriarchal stratification.

More broadly, beyond embroidery, craft and textiles in the twenty-first century continue to be vehicles for political expression and identity politics beyond gender binaries, albeit in new ways. Perhaps this is partly because, as suggested by Charlotte Gould, “if women artists at the turn of the century have inherited these struggles, their identity is no longer defined simply by a shared female experience”. Contemporary practitioners are communing online to share resources, ideas, and creations with one another, and interweaving these communications with their craft to the point that tools of communication become integral to modes of making. The current global pandemic has, in some cases, increased the potential of craft, textile, and sewing communities that use social media platforms to find new ways to express identity, community, subversion, and mutual aid through their craft. 

This issue is interested in the intersections between craft, digital technologies, and politics in the twenty-first century. Topics and areas of discussion may include but are not limited to:

  • Zoom knit-alongs
  • Communities and threads online dedicated to makers of craft and textiles
  • Queer sewcialists
  • Body positive sewing communities
  • Attempts to build anti-racist craft communities online
  • Stitch n Bitch meetups online
  • Sewing communities on social media
  • Online DIY craft cultures
  • Textiles as an expression of socio-political identities
  • Craftivism

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 30 Sep. 2022
  • Release date: 30 Nov. 2022
  • Editors: Christina Chau and Sky Croeser

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to thread@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'uniform'

Uniforms have been a ubiquitous part of daily life in the western world for the last couple of centuries. In Australia, about half of all Australians wear some sort of uniform, which serves to identify employees of an organisation in the public sphere. In doing so, uniforms overlay the identity of the individual with that of the organisation. However, this can be problematic as uniforms, in comparison to fashion, are often slow to evolve, especially when social norms and expectations change. This has led to the charge that uniforms can sometimes be ‘frozen in the past’, embodying ideals and ideology of a bygone era. This can be seen in the recent debates over the depiction of gender in uniforms, especially those worn in school or in jobs that have been defined as ‘feminine’ or ‘masculine’. The concept of uniforms does not only encompass the dress codes set by organisations. Some uniforms arise organically within social groups. Here, individuals seek to define their membership of a group through the conscious selection of, and wearing of, similarly styled or coloured clothing that represents for them a social uniform. Punk is an example here. Hence, the dress style of subcultures is generally depicted as a kind of uniform. This issue of M/C Journal will critically examine the meanings, choices, and changes in uniforms, in both their contemporary and historic guises.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 6 Jan. 2023
  • Release date: 8 Mar. 2023
  • Editors: Lisa J. Hackett and Jo Coghlan

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to uniform@journal.media-culture.org.au.