Information For Authors

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Upcoming Issues

Title Issue Editors Submission Date Release Date
'exclusion' Susanne Eichner and Corinna Lüthje 25 Sep. 2020 25 Nov. 2020
'bubbles' Jo Coghlan and Lisa J. Hackett 8 Jan. 2021 10 Mar. 2021
'dark' Luke Heemsbergen, Alexia Maddox, Amelia Johns, Toija Cinque, and Robert W. Gehl 19 Feb. 2021 21 Apr. 2021

'exclusion'

Exclusion is the antithesis of integration. In everyday life interactions, with and without media, mechanisms of exclusion and inclusion emerge simultaneously, contradicting each other and often politically motivated. Social media and social media groups have been praised as realms of political activism, as sheltered places for minority groups, or as platforms to give hitherto unheard voices a forum (e.g. #metoo). At the same time social media came to the fore as realms of exclusion and othering: we are witnessing verbal abuse, threats, and death threats on social media platforms against migrants, politicians, LGBTIQ persons, women, or activists. We are familiar with professional media output employing excluding terminologies and depictions of the outsider, thus evoking and strengthening ideas of the "other" (e.g. in terms of gender, ethnicity, political opinion, space, and place). We watch on screens in factual and fictional formats the depicted "other" - either as absent or as stereotyped.

This issue of M/C Journal seeks to contribute to a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of societal exclusion in and through media with a special focus on - but not restricted to - social media. Following the discussions of the Mediated Communication, Public Opinion, and Society Section at IAMCR Madrid 2019, we invite contributions on the theme of "exclusion" from a wide spectrum of social, cultural, institutional, and affective domains.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • exclusion in/through journalism
  • exclusion in/through social media
  • exclusion in/through fictional media
  • exclusion of communication
  • forms of exclusion
  • functions and dysfunctions of exclusion
  • exclusion, inclusion, and integration
  • exclusion and racism
  • exclusion and sexism
  • exclusion and populism
  • migration and exclusion
  • exclusion and social tensions

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 25 Sep. 2020
  • Release date: 25 Nov. 2020
  • Editors: Susanne Eichner, Corinna Lüthje

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to exclusion@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'bubbles'

Bubble. The word evokes imagery of a light, transient, frivolous phenomenon that quickly bursts should you try to touch it. The Oxford English Dictionary lists the word as both a noun and a verb, starting with the archetypal gas bubble, quickly moving onto concepts that suggest a removal from reality such as living in a bubble or an economic bubble. The interior of the bubble is a world apart from the norm, but its boundaries are so thin and permeable that it only takes the lightest touch for the two worlds to collide. We say ideas bubble up or bubble away, we have thought bubbles, speech bubbles, our emotions can bubble away. We can wear bubble skirts and bubble trousers, chew our bubble-gum, drink bubble tea or bubbly champagne, West Ham United supporters sing “I’m forever blowing bubbles”. We take bubble baths, sit in bubbly spas, some of us display bubbly personalities, some are even called ‘bubble’, some call their pets ‘bubble’, and then there is the ‘boy in the bubble’.

This issue explores the social phenomena that have earnt a bubbly epitaph. 

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 8 Jan. 2021
  • Release date: 10 Mar. 2021
  • Editors: Jo Coghlan and Lisa J. Hackett

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to bubbles@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'dark'

What is dark often connotes moral registers toward what society hides or fears. Yet ‘the dark' offers space for autonomy from digital visibilities that pervade economic, political and surveillance logics of the present age. While a technical rather than moral definition of darkness (Gehl) opens dark spaces that seek legitimacy and anonymities against structural surveillance, other readings of digitally mediated dark (Fisher and Bolter) suggest tensions between exploitative potentials and deep societal reflection. At the same time, dark algorithms and the dark faces they bias are vying for agency in a world where the power of being off grid and being in control of it are in flux; what happens when economies or nations are kept in the dark or forced to go dark, yet community and society persist? The tensions that darkness, being dark, acting dark, and becoming dark produce, show the normative powers of otherwise remaining in the light. 

This issue expands on tensions around what is dark and connected, challenging binaries that otherwise determine dark from light. Past the Dark Web and its social capacities, we reflect here on how the concept of ‘dark’ might expand opportunities for exploring notions of existence and persistence in dark times that remain datafied and require moral, ethical, and pragmatic responses to selves and communities seeking to be / belong in / of the dark. This issue invites responses to the theme 'dark', understood broadly as operating in and through digital places, powers, and practices whether technical, moral, or otherwise. Are we afraid of the dark?  

Possible considerations include (but are by no means limited to):

  • Theoretical, empirical, creative, methodological, ethical approaches to darkness;
  • Social/political activism on dark web or messenger platforms with end-to-end encryption (i.e. Signal, WhatsApp, Telegram);
  • The aesthetics and transformations of power;
  • Autonomy from surveillance;
  • Socio-technical discrimination through algorithmic structures;
  • Data motility and movement through dark and light spaces;
  • Comparative Internet governance and legislation of the unseen;
  • Acts of intrusion, appropriation, and piracy;
  • Machine readability and social control;
  • Ethical frameworks for researching dark web and dark social spaces

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 19 Feb. 2021
  • Release date: 21 Apr. 2021
  • Editors: Luke Heemsbergen, Alexia Maddox, Amelia Johns, Toija Cinque, and Robert W. Gehl

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to dark@journal.media-culture.org.au.